dr-br-ambedkar

Dalit March

mk gandhi

Dalit Arts & Culture

B. Protection of Civil Rights Act, 1955

The enforcement of Protection of Civil Rights Act, 1955 also brought to the fore limitations both of the law as well as its implementation in eliminating the practice of untouchability in view of its entrenched position in the psyche and behaviour of the caste Hindus and their resistance to change. Society as a whole never accepted the Protection of Civil Rights Act3. Meanwhile various atrocities against scheduled castes and scheduled tribes continued to be committed in different parts of the country. It was realized that even the amended Protection of Civil Rights Act, 1955 and normal provisions of IPC did not provide deterrence in preventing violence on scheduled castes and scheduled tribes especially offences committed on caste grounds4. Accordingly, Parliament passed another law called “Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989”. The Rules under the Act were framed in 1995 to prevent commission of atrocities against members of the Schedules Castes and Tribes, to provide for special courts for the trial of such offences and for the relief and rehabilitation of the victims of such offences and for matters connected there with or incidental thereto.